Author Archive

Rundholz DIP: Contemporary Comfort

Bright, vibrant palettes, oversized, casual silhouettes and a generous amount of fun and lightheartedness defines spring 2023’s collection from Rundholz DIP.

Rundholz DIP

Typically presenting the more experimental and offbeat designs of the three Rundholz lines, Carsten Rundholz and his wife Lenka adopt a variety of influences in DIP, from streetwear to unconventional production techniques.

However, for this season’s collection, the fabrics, cuts and dyes all point to athleisure inspired garments developed with an avant-garde edge.

Rundholz DIP

Ideal for transitional dress for spring, cozy zip-up sweaters come with short sleeves while pullovers are cropped to lend a feeling of brevity.

Tops come in laid-back, oversized fits as well as longline cuts below the waist in a refreshingly light weight.

With these shirts and sweaters complimented by a pair of simple, soft pants ready for going out or staying in, the collection is colored in warm finishes of oranges, reds and yellows accompanied by light neutrals.

Rundholz DIP

As expected, Carsten and Lenka have delivered the perfect addition to anyone’s wardrobe during the warming temperatures and gusts and rains of spring.

With one eye on the ever sought-after comfort of athletic-inspired, easy garments, and the other on cutting-edge design, Rundholz DIP’s newest collection shares straightforward, artistically-minded clothing that is both timeless and well made.


Lika Behar: Exceptional Turquoise

Within Lika Behar’s turquoise jewelry lies the blue-green of a rolling ocean.

Lika Behar

It’s no surprise to find this natural inspiration throughout her collection — the Sea of Marmara hugs the coast of her native Istanbul.

Alongside her turquoise, she features lapis, Australian Opal and diamond in a quartet of earthy delights.

Nestled in 22k gold and oxidized silver, her organic shapes evoke the ancient landscape of Turkey.

Lika Behar

Lika’s turquoise and yellow gold pairing — a combination favored since antiquity — is the foundation upon which she highlights the tension between prehistory and modern sensibility.

Working alongside her small team of artisans within her studio, Lika captures the confluence of Istanbul. It is a city of juxtaposition, influenced by both ancient Greek and Byzantine civilizations. Today, it sits at the contemporary heart of East and West.

Lika Behar

A descendant of gold coin dealers in Turkey, Lika Behar’s lineage is omnipresent in her jewelry. Her precious gems including this Persian turquoise are sourced from reputable dealers who have often worked with her family for generations.

Through time and timelessness, her jewelry links us with a long history of craft, beauty and a celebration of the natural elements that shape our lives.

Lika Behar

A Tentative Atelier: A Romantic Paradox

A Tentative Atelier’s Spring/Summer ’23 line exudes a subtle confidence.

A Tentative Atelier

The pieces are unexpected and intricate — a dynamic forever at play within the brand’s presentations.

Within each piece lies a central juxtaposition.

Light and dark, austerity and imagination, softness and structure.

This is a collection unafraid of the romantic tension of opposites.

A Tentative Atelier
A Tentative Atelier

Design duo Nam Tsang and Pauline Yuen employ a small team of Hong Kong’s finest artisans and craftspeople.

They utilize old techniques to infuse a sense of history into their work.

Through the union of asymmetrical lines, feminine ruching, classic silhouettes and natural fabrics, A Tentative Atelier’s distinct character is achieved.

A Tentative Atelier

The studio delivers meticulous handiwork: whipstitched ribbon peeks out from a silk trench coat, delicate pleats embellish a suit coat and classic lines sublimate raw, natural linen.

The cream and white color palette shines light on the collection, contrasting against dark silk and jacquard patchwork.

There’s a sense of wholeness, where contradiction is welcomed and rendered into beauty.

A Tentative Atelier

Fulani Textiles: Traditional African Weavings

Among the largest group of pastoral nomads in the world, the Fulani are part of a millennia of aesthetic ritual.

Fulani

Using handspun sheep’s wool, they weave together stunning, utilitarian pieces that reflect the transience of their maker’s origin.

Traces of ancestry and neighboring cultural influence peek out from the warp and weft — a brief history of African textile traditions is captured within each piece.

Fulani
Fulani

The main textile produced by the Fulani is known as a Khasa — a blanket made from handspun sheep’s wool.

The Khasa functioned to enclose and define a personal space, and could be easily transported.

In contrast to this everyday presence, the piece shown below would have been a wedding blanket — as evidenced by its elevated, decorative approach.

Fulani
Fulani

The Fulani have existed since the 5th century and have occupied many different regions throughout West Africa.

This particular selection of textiles originates from early 20th century Mali.

Motifs of the nearby Tuareg and Berber communities can be found within the designs.

Fulani
Fulani

Due to early Islamic influence, the Fulani did not develop a tradition of figural or sculpted art.

Instead they turned to the meditation of geometry — intricate, interlocking patterns sprawl across each piece.

These simple, repeating shapes represent the myths, stories and rituals of their culture.


Daniela Gregis: The Fruits of Creative Living

Daniela Gregis’s approach is one of poetic living — her clothes encourage the ease of a life in harmony with its surroundings.

Daniela Gregis

Her envisioned environment may include a quiet, sunsoaked study, an antique desk covered in sketches or the table of an intimate gathering — one stocked with good food and even better friends.

In all places where creativity and joy are found, Daniela’s work fits seamlessly into the fabric of being.

Daniela Gregis

In playing with this new spring delivery, we found a twinned essence in Wommelsdorff’s knits.

The notable beauty of this line, in addition to its incredibly soft hand, is its lack of seams.

Designer Anne Schramm and her knitters work exceptionally hard to create a continuous garment with no break in the visual line.

When moving into spring, we seek the pieces that can transition between snowy mornings and warm afternoons and stay comfortable all day — an easy task for a Daniela Gregis and Wommelsdorff combination.

Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis

Our process is one of experimentation and pure joy — paint the backgrounds, throw on the clothes and see how it all works together.

Our studio is often alight with laughter as we test what works and what doesn’t.

This shoot was conceptualized by Shobhan, painted by Miranda, styled by Olha, shot by Tim and modeled by Mona.

In this practice together we find our own joie de vivre!

Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis

The subtle elegance of Daniela Gregis’ works is perhaps the most notable — a well-placed slit at the cuff of a sleeve or at the notch of a neck ensures each piece is flattering for a myriad of body types, even when the tag says “one size.”

The crumpling of her printed cottons, sourced from the acclaimed Liberty London, lends itself to easy dressing.

No iron or pressing needed — just throw on the piece and find your inspiration.

Daniela Gregis

View the collections below


Salt & Pepper

Oranges & Apples

Rasberries & Cream

Why Wear a Hat: Horisaki Design & Handel

What does a small Swedish workshop in Småland have to do with fashionable practicality and the search for the inner self?

Images via Horisaki Design & Handel

Though on the surface these disparate topics seem to lack connection, they all converge at the meeting place of headwear and how it can define one’s sense of fashion.

Similar to footwear, hats come in such a large variety of styles, shapes, colors and characteristics that they have the ability to define the personality and values of the wearer sometimes more than clothing can.

Headwear can provide a defense to one’s vulnerabilities, acting as a literal or metaphorical shield by guarding the wearer from the elements or by granting an air of confidence.

A head covering can gift comfort like a blanket or can serve as a simple fix to wardrobe styling by hiding messy hair or elevating the aesthetics of an outfit.

A hat can connect a person to their core personality, reinforcing the elegance of the sophisticated, the nonchalance of the casual, the utility of the practical and the simplicity of the straightforward.

Tying all this back to a small Swedish workshop in Småland, this is why we carry the handmade headpieces of Horsaki Design and Handel.

Run by husband and wife duo Karin and Makoto Horisaki, the two run their charming millinery by fusing Japanese and Swedish design influences while shaping, sewing, brushing and burning leather and suede to form their headwear that is rich in unique character.

The handmade quality of their work demonstrates their respect for materials and exudes a timelessness thanks to the blending of classic and modern techniques.

These handcrafted, detail-oriented qualities inherently honor the principles of slow fashion by their skilled team producing long lasting, artisanal headwear that takes advantage of experimental, sustainable practices such as tinting their pieces with natural elements.

We not only support Karin and Makoto because they are talented designers, but also because they are simply great people and authentic business owners.

For over a decade, they have crafted sharp, storied pieces capable of refining, solidifying and enhancing not only a wearer’s outfit, but their personality and the way they exist in the world.

“Fashion you can buy, but style you possess. The key to style is learning who you are, which takes years. There’s no how-to road map to style. It’s about self expression and, above all, attitude.”

—Iris Apfel


Sophie Hong: Exploring the World’s Ancient Fabrics

In Sophie Hong’s last exhibition — a celebratory feat held at La Piscine Roubaix Museum in Northern France — she described her work as “clothes for the soul.”

Sophie Hong

The exhibition focused on her materials and the patient process of turning mulberry leaves into richly dyed mud silks.

Sophie Hong creates her collections to bridge the gap between inner being and outer presentation.

Her specialty, typically dark brown, green and black pieces that have been expertly cut and studded with glass and pearl buttons, are joined in her latest collection by a selection of flowing, shibori-dyed silks.

Sophie Hong

Raw Silk Indigo Shibori Shirt
– A-line shape that can be worn open
– Hand-dyed with a light texture
– Double collar beaded with pearl

Blue Silk Organza Shirt
– Tightly woven silk with a light shine
– Shorter cut for defining shape
– Mud silk details along edge of fabric

Sophie Hong
Sophie Hong

Highly Fitted Mud Silk Short Jacket
– Slim fit through shoulders and waist
– Double collar with inset yoke
– Wear with a rolled or straight cuff

New Tunic Dress Design
– Special textural, mini pleat fabric
– Beautifully curved slits in hem
– Can be worn with open or closed collar

Sophie Hong
Sophie Hong

Shop all Sophie Hong

What is Mud Silk?

Lauren Manoogian: Color Contrast

Lauren Manoogian’s pieces are intended to live in the world — part of her choice to become a designer was to explore how clothing influences the bodily experience.

Lauren Manoogian

Her background in sculpture plays a significant role here.

Tactile elements, such as elastic gathering, round cuts and tight pleats, build interlocking shapes within her larger, simplified silhouettes.

Through her designs, she presents dressing as a subtle and elegant art, lovingly chiseled from cotton and alpaca yarn.

Lauren Manoogian
Lauren Manoogian

A spectrum of emotion exists within this delivery — nubby, neutral knits speak to the label’s core earthiness.

Their intelligent shapes are a reflection of calm and poise.

The addition of a few black pieces, a color Lauren has not presented within her collections since 2015, throws the typical Manoogian aesthetic to the wind.

In these, we feel the push and pull of austerity and self-reflection.

Lauren Manoogian
Lauren Manoogian

Lauren’s love affair with textile is apparent within every garment.

From the feel of the fabric to her sculptural cuts, a great deal of care is placed on the soul and presence of each piece.

Even the placement of stitches — something that may seem a minor detail to the uninitiated — are well-considered for maximum impact within the garment.

Overall, this is a collection made to live in, and feel good doing so.

Lauren Manoogian

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New in Wildlife: Treasures of Anatolia

Earthenware, a pottery fired at a lower temperature than stoneware or porcelain, is among the world’s oldest materials.

Pottery

Falling into the same category as terracotta and brick, this ceramic has been referred to as the building block of civilization.

From our collection, we present an offering of antique Anatolian earthenware and its connection to the roots of human creativity.

Pottery

Falling into the same category as terracotta and brick, this ceramic has been referred to as the building block of civilization. From our collection, we present an offering of antique Anatolian earthenware and its connection to the roots of human creativity.

The pots have been raku fired, a process wherein the ceramic is heated to a high temperature in a kiln and then quickly removed and submerged in a flammable material such as wood shavings or paper. The technique starves them of oxygen and infuses a delightful, irregular char into the surface of the piece.

Pottery

The shapes speak to a heritage of ceramic — elements of Greek amphora and Turkish vases make an appearance in the silhouette and twin handles of each piece.

As these works are over 150 years old, in these primitive vessels lies a clear thread from antiquity to today.


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Daniela Gregis: The Warmth of Rossella

For Spring and Summer 2023, Daniela Gregis continues to imbue her personality and identity into her designs. 

Daniela Gregis Rossella

Mimicking family gatherings and dinners where she provides gifts for loved ones and friends, the reds, whites and blacks of the Rossella collection was shown alongside a large table setting complete with a hand-painted tablecloth to match the designs.

To play off this familial, light-hearted energy, we’ve photographed Daniela’s designs against a hand-painted backdrop and table setting, the warmth of smiles and laughs radiating through the studio as we styled the vibrant collection.

Daniela Gregis Rossella
Daniela Gregis Rossella

“…daniela gregis writes, draws, scribbles and phones…for each idea that has come true, another thousand take shape in one studio laboratory that

never limited the concept of creativity…daniela laughs worrie gets angry and has a little present for everyone…friends, relatives, cousins,

children, mothers and perfect strangers exchange roles, interact and shape some always new and entertaining creations creatures…

…through mulberry and silk the worm walks weaving long skirts with care and craftsmanship…the whole dress is a boundless white

wave, embossed with embroidered cream yolks and vanilla pods, almost invisible at first glance…cinnamon, blueberries and citrus peel

mark the hem of the dress, softly reddening the selvedge that caresses the floor…the twirl of the long cloth carries away the scent and warmth

of the yeast, which like pollen reaches every sense…the oven is on…the thread is woven…relentless, the loom keeps spinning the wheat,

one ear at a time…the ochre ribbon of linen fibers, is soaked and varnished in the oil of its own seeds inside a large copper tub and it wraps the

dress as soon as it’s worn…with molds cut out of fowers, the fabric is dusted with coffee powder…fnally, the last seven almonds of september,

tie the tunic on the chest and the wild berries decorate the cuffs and the collar…she wears the white suit and begins her light dance…rossella”

Daniela Gregis: Tangerine Dream

In anticipation of the sunshine to come, Daniela Gregis has greeted spring with open arms.

Daniela Gregis

Her first delivery for the season is ripe with bright colors — tangerine and cherry appear alongside a vibrant pink silk that winks to Pantone’s color of the year, Viva Magenta.

Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis

This exuberant palette is underscored by Daniela’s natural inclination for aesthetic purity.

Rather than design in excess, she lets each fabric speak for itself through just a few cuts and gathers.

Bolts of tightly spun cotton and silk are transformed into expertly tailored jackets, tops and dresses.

With each wear, more and more complexity is revealed by her designs.

Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis

Electing to work in a largely one-size model, Daniela’s pieces are flattering on many silhouettes and body types.

Simultaneously intellectual and feminine, each reminds us of the primal joy of dressing, an opportunity to present yourself to the world with lots of character and little fuss.

Herein lies the beauty of Daniela Gregis — her collections represent the intersection of unbridled bliss, effortless simplicity and design genius.

Daniela Gregis

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Horisaki Hats: The Swedish Art of Slow Style

Style is complicated, to say the least.

Horisaki

In the words of Iris Apfel, “the key to style is learning who you are, which takes years.”

For some it comes naturally, for others it takes a lifetime of getting to know the inner self.

Luckily, for those of us less patient, there is a shortcut — and it’s just on the top of your head.

Horisaki
Horisaki

Karin and Makoto of Horisaki Design & Handel have been making stylish headwear since 2012. Their small, Swedish workshop is brimming with designs informed by centuries of European millinery traditions — infusing classic and modern techniques to create pieces ripe for self-expression.

Their hats are made entirely by hand, with a clear respect for the materials used. Their leather and suede is individually shaped, sewn, brushed and burned to infuse the hat with unique character and presence. Longevity is key here — a Horisaki that is stylish today will remain stylish decades from now.

We champion Karin and Makoto’s work for a variety of reasons, although their dedication to slow fashion (and all the wonderful and difficult things that accompany such a practice) will always be at the forefront.

By carrying their collections, we are able to not only engage with some of the loveliest, most thoughtful creators, but to celebrate a small team that gives the rest of us the tools to express our inner selves.

Horisaki

“If you love something, wear it all the time. Find things that suit you. This is how you look extraordinary.”

— Vivienne Westwood


Casey Casey: First Spring Delivery

We are drawn to the romance of landscape.

Casey Casey

Be it adventure, peace or sheer inspiration, scenery is the siren call of nature.

Gareth Casey feels the same way — infusing his eponymous line, Casey Casey, with all the colors and purist textures of a designer equally as inspired.

Casey Casey
Casey Casey
Casey Casey

The most delightful aspect of Casey Casey is its fabrics — Gareth takes care to source materials that are not only exquisite, but lasting.

His work is prominently defined by the use of paper cottons, however soft wool voile and crisp linen make the occasional appearance.

Natural textures are key here — the signature Casey Casey crumpling seems derived from sweeping wheat fields and the rugged vistas of the French Alps.

Casey Casey
Casey Casey
Casey Casey

Those who follow the label closely will remember its venture into the Neapolitan tones of cream, tan and pink last spring — Gareth instead found his ’23 palette within a patch of wild berries.

Titled Navy & Raspberry, the collection presents Byzantium purples alongside a selection of deep ocean blues.

The intense color is punchy against Casey Casey’s more traditional pale yellow and white shirting, reminiscent of the natural drama found where earth meets sky.

Casey Casey
Casey Casey
Casey Casey

TAP by Todd & Debra Pownell: Diamonds at Dusk

The shared interest of fine art and design sits at the heart of TAP, a jewelry line conceived by husband and wife duo, Todd and Debra Pownell.

TAP by Todd Pownell

Together, they fuse contemporary diamond presentations with a heritage of classical jewelry-making techniques to create their unique line.

TAP by Todd Pownell

Todd and Debra’s specialty? Reverse-set diamonds, where the usually-hidden pavillion of the stone takes center stage. With the diamond’s crown set into gold, its facets are exposed to light — an effect that creates an unmatched twinkle within each piece.

As mesmerizing as their stones are, the duo’s textured precious metals are somehow even more stunning. Using both 18K gold and oxidized silver, TAP mixes and matches the noble metals to craft pieces that are contemporary, elemental and endlessly layerable.

TAP by Todd Pownell
TAP by Todd Pownell

Within Todd and Debra’s practice, natural inspirations abound.

Pebbled bezels hug the organic curve of a pendant like a drop of water in sand.

Constellations of diamonds nest in a granular-finish silver much like a freshly split geode.

This connection between space, sky and earth is ever-present within the TAP’s designs — one that Todd and Debra describe as a “respect for the innate properties of the [materials they] use.”


Introducing: Bergfabel

Bergfabel, a portmanteau of the German for “mountain” and “folktale,” is a label weaving the story of South Tyrol.

Bergfabel

This well-kept secret, tucked among the Dolomites where Austria and Northern Italy meet, is something out of a fairytale — crystalline lakes, quaint villages and a rolling green landscape that stretches for miles.

Wandering these hills since childhood, designer Klaus Plank and his partner, Barbara, have distilled his life in South Tyrol into a line of clothing fit for those who wish to wander as well.

Bergfabel
Bergfabel
Bergfabel
Bergfabel

Bergfabel, at first blush, could best be described as Italian countryside couture.

The colors are creamy and understated. Semi-fitted jackets and exquisite cotton shirting are presented alongside breezy apron dresses and tops.

Instead of leaning into the natural severity of tailored cut-and-sewn, an air of levity permeates the collection — these are carefree pieces designed to last a lifetime in harmony with the wanderer.

Bergfabel
Bergfabel
Bergfabel

Klaus’s approach is undeniably modern, informed by decades of tweaking and testing the designs.

However, his handwoven fabrics and careful attention to finish speaks to classical influence.

Throughout Bergfabel, Klaus strives for a temporal connection, wherein each piece is wholly informed by the best things of a favorite heirloom — natural colors, pure materials and well-cut silhouettes.

Bergfabel
Bergfabel
Bergfabel

This delightful tension between modernity and heritage trickles down to the smallest details — such as hand-written paper tags, with the style and size scribbled in pen, to the delicately tied lavender sachets that hang from each garment.

The latter is inspired by Klaus’s mother, who hung similar pouches in her closet.

Today, her home garden supplies the lavender for each piece. Klaus refers to this inclusion as a “gift” for the wearer — a little piece of South Tyrol to inspire the wanderer in us all.


Péro: Daisy Chain

For Péro’s first spring delivery, designer Aneeth Aurora returns to fabled flora.

Péro

Daisies, daffodils and buttercups crop up across the collection — both harbingers of spring and the feeling of renewal that accompanies it.

In the quintessential Péro way, the delicate flowers appear in many decorative forms — as embroidery, eyelets, layered applique and intricate beading that all seem to sprout directly from the garments themselves.

Péro
Engravings by Elizabeth Blackwell, 1737 via The New York Library Digital Collections
Péro
Péro
Péro
Péro

Rendered in cheery yellow and cornflower blue, Aneeth’s fabrics float across the skin.

Her choice of handwoven cotton and silk make her airy silhouettes somehow even lighter — cascading in double and triple layers down the form.

When combined with Aneeth’s fresh florals, the collection exudes the joy of spring.

Péro
Péro

“There are always flowers for those who want to see them.”

— Henri Matisse


Antique Textiles from Tunisia

Tunisia, a North African country along the Mediterranean, is home to some of the world’s oldest textile traditions.

Tunisia Textiles

Berber weavings in particular celebrate the region’s rich social and cultural diversity, with influences derived from the Greek, Andalusian, Ottoman and Arabic civilizations.

We present a small selection of these antique weavings, which capture a history of Tunisian spiritual and folkloric sentiments through cotton and wool.

Tunisia Textiles
Tunisia Textiles

These Tunisian textiles, originating from the early to mid 1900s, were crafted in the historic village of Chenini.

This ancient hilltop settlement has been home to the nomadic Berber people for a millennia.

Nestled in the sandy dunes of the Sahara, Chenini acted as a robust agricultural and weaving destination for travelers on their way to the larger Tataouine.

Tunisia Textiles

The three pieces in red are Bakhnoug shawls, originally intended as a religious headdress worn by Berber women.

The blue textile is of the Mahmoudi tradition and is a piece that would have been worn as a mantle or a shawl during a wedding ceremony.

The white geometric symbols woven throughout each piece express the sacred beliefs of the original maker.

Tunisia Textiles
Tunisia Textiles
Tunisia Textiles

Antique pieces like this live many lives before they make it to our hands.

They represent centuries of aesthetic ritual and cultural importance, and they have often been a core part of the daily lives of the people who made them.

They are, ultimately, pieces of art — we hope you will join us in exploring and enjoying their unique history and character.


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Daniela Gregis: A Rose by Any Other Name

For Spring/Summer ’23, Daniela Gregis invites us to stop and smell the roses.

Daniela Gregis

The delivery is titled Rossella, a play on words that means both “little rose” and “redhead” in Italian.

Throughout the collection, she weaves a story of spring’s small details.

Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis

Daniela’s narrative begins in the garden of a secluded Bergamo estate.

She describes the mulberry tree growing out front, and the silkworms that inch along its bark to produce delicate strands of silk.

Close by, white linens simmer in large copper tubs, each dyed a sweet cream color by the same seeds that grew the fibers.

Pollen floats through the air alongside the delicate pappus of dandelions.

Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis

From there her story expands into a humble kitchen, just paces from this verdant terrace.

The warm aroma of yeast and flour rises from the fresh bread baking in the oven.

Cinnamon bark, blueberries, citrus peel and almonds litter the knotted wood counter — a hint of sweeter things to come.

Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis

On the bench, handspun cotton threads and carefully cut silk flowers lay in wait for their final place in Daniela Gregis’ spring wardrobe.

Espresso powder and flax dust the fabrics — a final, earthy touch.

Daniela Gregis
Daniela Gregis

Jan-Jan Van Essche: A Feat of Fabric

Jan-Jan Van Essche’s spring collection, appropriately titled Zeal, is a feat of fabric.

Jan-Jan Van Essche

Sumi linen blends meet handwoven Kasuri cotton ikats for a range of textiles that are as delightful to look at as they are to touch.

The pieces are incredibly structural while maintaining a wearable liquidity – one of Jan-Jan’s most impressive skills is his ability to take a single, exquisite piece of fabric and craft a garment with just a few cuts and minimal seams.

Jan-Jan Van Essche
Jan-Jan Van Essche

The collection is overall neutral – olives, tans and creams dominate the palette – however the addition of a flowing waterfall blue takes the delivery into an elemental territory.

Upon closer inspection of this intriguing textile, the intricacy of its weave takes hold.

Rather than printed, it is created by the Kasuri technique, an ancient Japanese form of ikat where each fiber is individually dyed and carefully interlaced to achieve this ebbing pattern.

Jan-Jan Van Essche

Recently highlighted as Pitti Uomo’s featured Designer Project, Jan-Jan brings fluidity and essential concepts to the forefront of the industry.

This project, which marked the label’s first formal runway show, was Jan-Jan in full form.

As described by Lapo Cianchi, the communications director for Pitti Uomo, Jan-Jan Van Essche represents “[a] model of elegance and naturalness…an idea of freedom.”

Jan-Jan Van Essche
Images via Pitti Uomo

Pitti Uomo is a biannual gathering of retailers, editors and menswear enthusiasts held in Florence, Italy.

Each season, this massive endeavor hosts a number of special projects, such as capsule shows and large-scale brand installations, in addition to an all-out runway show featuring a hand-picked designer. Its unique, global mix of creativity, craft and culture makes it an incredibly sophisticated, front-row seat to not only the upcoming trends, but the contemporary heartbeat of fashion.

Jan-Jan Van Essche
Jan-Jan Van Essche
Jan-Jan Van Essche
Jan-Jan Van Essche
Jan-Jan Van Essche

Sacai: Dimensional Design

For Pre-Spring, Sacai is strutting the streets of Shibuya.

Sacai

Inspired by the deceptively casual style of urban dress, the showmanship of high fashion and the construction of modern workwear, designer Chitose Abe creates pieces that are as fun to look at as they are to throw on.

In this latest delivery, ribbed knits, denim tops and sporty jackets take center stage in Chitose’s ode to the style capital of Tokyo.

Sacai
Sacai
Sacai

Rife with technical prowess, Chitose’s garments combine elements from disparate sources, such as marrying the classic silhouette of a cardigan but rendering it in the textile of a sporty windbreaker.

The piece might be finished with oversized military pocket details, studded with silver rivets or fan out in the back in a wave of delicately pleated fabric – unexpected is to be expected when it comes to Sacai.

Sacai
Sacai

These seemingly outlandish juxtapositions are what make Sacai’s pieces so exemplary.

Just like Shibuya, Chitose’s unique combination of practicality, artistry and tenacity ensures a collection with a strong impression.

By reenvisioning the building blocks of each garment, she accesses an entirely new level of style – one that nods to both the history of fashion and its future to come.

Sacai

Introducing Lemaire

Established in 1991 by Christophe Lemaire and relaunched in 2007 as the namesake label we know today, Lemaire offers classic Parisian style interpreted for the contemporary wardrobe.

Lemaire

Former Artistic Director for Hermès, Christophe draws upon a heritage of style and grace to conceptualize the pared-down, but sophisticated garments of Lemaire.

Created alongside his co-director, Sarah-Linh Tran, the label describes their approach as “nonchalant elegance” — the generous volumes of their cuts allow for space between body and garment with adjustable elements throughout for the wearer to structure the garment as they please.

Lemaire

Each collection is developed and designed within Paris’ historic Le Marais district, just a stone’s throw away from Musee National Picasso and the tranquil gardens of the French National Archive.

Their studio prizes natural, breathable textiles, each is handpicked for its authenticity.

The particular crisp of a cotton or special weave of a silk is why the designers choose to work with it.

Lemaire